Case Number 6495
Request Date 22/01/2019
Completion Date 06/03/2019

 

Details of the Request

  1. How long is the waiting list for psychological treatment for women and for men identified with mental health problems during the postnatal period?
  2. How many in-patient “mother and baby” psychiatric beds do you have?
  3. What types of treatments are offered to women with depression after pregnancy?
  4. What types of treatments are offered to men with depression after pregnancy?
  5. What types of treatments are offered to women with anxiety after pregnancy?
  6. What types of treatments are offered to men with anxiety after pregnancy?
  7. What types of treatments are offered to women and men with psychosis after pregnancy?
  8. What types of treatments are offered to men with psychosis after pregnancy?

 

Details of the Response

1. How long is the waiting list for psychological treatment for women and for men identified with mental health problems during the postnatal period?

If the woman is identified in the postnatal period as requiring psychological support she will be immediately placed on an enhanced care pathway which means she is not discharged to the health visitor until day 28, normally we would discharge at approximately day 10. If they require moderate to severe psychological support then they are seen relatively quickly once the woman is referred to the perinatal mental health team. They will be contacted the same day they are referred. We do not have a service that we can refer for the fathers but there are new groups being created all the time now and we have free groups that support dads for psychological support. We will refer the men to see their GP.

 

2. How many in-patient “mother and baby” psychiatric beds do you have?

The Trust does not have a "mother and baby" unit at this trust. Patients are sent to the Trust’s local units in Winchester and Kent.

 

3. What types of treatments are offered to women with depression after pregnancy?

As a maternity unit we offer enhanced postnatal visits up to day 28 for extra support with their mental health. The Trust’s perinatal mental health midwife will do postnatal house visits when needed. The Trust’s perinatal mental health team provide advice, care and treatment for women with a wide range of mental health problems up to one year after the woman's baby is born. This can include:

  • Helping weigh up the risks and benefits of using medication during breastfeeding.
  • Psychological treatments such as talking therapies.
  • Helping make a plan for the woman’s postnatal period.
  • Giving advice and information about mental health problems to partners and family members to help them understand the woman’s risk of becoming unwell and how to support.
  • Arrange admission to a mother and baby unit if needed.
  • Providing support for women discharged from a mother and baby unit.

 

4. What types of treatments are offered to men with depression after pregnancy?

The men can get advice from the perinatal mental health team and/or go to their GP.

 

5. What types of treatments are offered to women with anxiety after pregnancy?

This is a similar answer as to the depression question above: each woman is assessed as an individual and their pathway is tailored for them.

 

6. What types of treatments are offered to men with anxiety after pregnancy?

The men can get advice from the perinatal mental health team and/or go to their GP.

 

7. What types of treatments are offered to women and men with psychosis after pregnancy?

These women are treated immediately and if presenting with psychosis will be assessed initially in A and E if they are already home. We need to maintain their immediate safety and of their newborn. Medication is not delayed and anti-psychotics are normally started relatively quickly. They can be cared for at home with close supervision of the perinatal mental health team or the alternative is to go to a mother and baby unit. Sometimes unfortunately, they become too unwell and then the woman will have to be transferred to an acute unit and the baby will then stay home with the family. With the new perinatal mental health team what we can achieve now is to take precaution prior to them delivering and put a robust plan in place so we can reduce the risks for any type of psychosis to return. The risk of having another episode is between 50-75%.

 

8. What types of treatments are offered to men with psychosis after pregnancy?

None. Men who get post natal depression are dealt with through their GP who will arrange treatment with the adult community mental health team.